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14, Dec 2014

Being asked to do a talk in Dubai

Truly amazing to be asked to do a talk to other opticians in the country Dubai.

This is how I Researched the market

Emailed 50 opticians asking for a appointment

Got my eyes tested all over Dubai.

Conclusion is getting your eyes tested in the UK is much more thorough we Checkley the internal part as well as your vision.

Need your eyes tested by a International speaker ?

Book a sight test in Enfield with goodlooking optics

Garry Kousoulou speaks in the Middle East

Garry Kousoulou speaks in the Middle East

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eyetest-enfiled town
18, Apr 2014

Why does my Optometrist check my colour vision?

Why does my Optometrist check my colour vision?

 

Colour and culture

 

Colours are deeply ingrained in human society and culture. Throughout history colours have been used to indicate prosperity (purple), purity (white), danger (red), health (green) among many others. National identity is always closely associated with colours (Orange for Netherlands, Red for Wales, Green for Ireland). Among its other uses colour can be used as a non-verbal command (traffic lights the obvious example) or to indicate gender (pink and blue).

 

 

Pick up any fashion magazine in a supermarket and there are pages devoted to the colours which are ‘in’ this season, and colours not to wear together. Crossing the road at the traffic lights there is a green man and a red man. In HMV there are piles of colourful album covers to catch your eye. That is before you even see the name of the artist (Green Day, Black Sabbath, Pink Floyd, Blue) or songs (Blue Suede Shoes, Yellow Submarine [left], Purple Rain).

 

Colour is ingrained so deep into our psyche that is incredibly difficult to complete dissociate it from anything in your daily life.

mavi jim

 

Why do we have colour vision?

 

As with many other creatures in the animal kingdom, through millions of years of evolution humans have developed the ability to discriminate colour. But why is this? Why should this trait have b                         een passed on throughout history? Following the Darwinian theory of evolution it is only logical to assume that the ability to discriminate colour proved advantageous, hence the ‘fitter’ individuals prospered and passed on their traits.

 

The best way to indicate how colour vision would be an advantage would be to put a few questions to the reader:

 

1)    Could you tell if a fruit is ripe or past its best?

2)    Could you differentiate between cooked and uncooked meat?

3)    Would you know if the frog you are holding is a poison dart frog or local amphibian?

 

Hopefully the answer to all 3 is yes! However I challenge you to try again without using colour as a guide. It is a lot harder. Therefore it is clear to see colour vision is an advantage

 

Based on this mechanism, through evolution we have seen animals develop some fantastic coloured displays for attracting a mate (as seen to the right), warding off predators and camouflaging into the background to hunt prey.

 

How does colour vision work?

 

Animals possess two types of light sensitive cells – rods & cones. Rods are mainly responsible for sensing brightness. They are most sensitive to movement and seeing incredibly dark images, but give poor detail. Cones are responsible for sensing colour and fine detail. Humans possess 1 type of rod and 3 types of cone, other mammals possess more or less.

 

Cones are sensitive to one particular colour, hence are highly stimulated by a light of that exact colour. Hence an animal with a cone sensitive to blue light would only be sensitive to blue objects. However this does not mean this animal would not see a red object. It just means that objects are either a shade of blue, or not blue at all. For sake of argument imagine an artist only using blue paint. He may water down the blue paint to change its shade, but cannot make the paint red.

 

In the case of humans, we have cones sensitive to blue, green and red. Therefore we can not just determine if an object is red or not, blue or not and green or not, but determine if it is a combination. This means that instead of being restricted to blue paint only, the artist could not mix a whole palette of colours, hence giving us colour vision!

 

As humans have 3 cones, we can perceive a larger range of colours than an animal with only 2 cones (for example a dog) and a smaller range than the mantis shrimp (pictured right) that has an incredible 12 cones! That being said even 2 animals with the same number of cones do not possess the same colours vision. Using the analogy of paint from above, you may use 2 different pots of paint that another artist, hence still use plenty of colour, just different ones.

 

As a matter of pure interest a recent study showed that 2% of women possess a 4th cone. Although in most cases this cone does not work, a few women in the study demonstrated superior colour differentiation than observed in a normal human. This study may explain the age old argument why women use a ridiculous number of words for purple (lavendar, thistle, plum, fuchsia, magenta, violet, in digo, amethyst etc).

 

So what is colour blindness?

 

As a child, a friend of mine tried convincing me that being colour blind was like watching black and white TV all day. You just saw 50 shades of gray and that was it. Although his logic and reasoning seemed sound, with a firmer understanding of the visual system as explained above, I would hope that you would know this is not the case!

 

In colour ‘blindness’ a perfectly normal person is either missing a photoreceptive cone (dichromat), or has a cone which does not work properly (anomalous trichromat). Due to in essence possessing only 2 cones, a person will not be able to perceive colours as well as someone with 3 cones. Brushing with 2 paints not 3 as it were.

 

This is caused due to a damaged gene carried on the X chromosome. As women carry two X chromosomes, a duplicate gene is present. In men however, as there is only one X chromosome, if the gene is damaged, there is no replacement. This is reflected in the prevalence of colour blindness – less than 0.1% of girls are colour blind, yet approximately 8% of men are colour blind. This means that an incredible 578 million men world wide are colour blind (assuming a world population of 7.2 billion). It should also be noted that as the X chromosome is passed on down the generations, it is common to find colour blindness runs in families.

 

Why does my Optometrist test my colour vision?

 

As illustrated in the previous paragraph, a whopping 8% of the male population is colour blind. Due to the pure numbers at work it is highly likely that in every school classroom that there is a boy who is colour blind. In general optometrists will test a childs colour vision at their first eye examination to check for colour blindness.

 

If a child is colour blind, it is very important for the parents to know this. As a child is in school they can be embarrassed and ridiculed for colouring in a picture the wrong colour. Handouts to the class and wall displays may also be incredibly difficult for a colour blind child to read (despite being perfectly legible to the ‘normal’ teacher). For the fashion conscious, colour blindness can cause a wardrobe catastrophe. A nightmare for many teenagers. For the very youngest children, even learning colours can be confusing and difficult as can be seen in the two images below:

The image to the left is the original, the image to the right is that seen by a red/green colour deficiency

 

In my own personal experience, I found a geography text book filled with pie charts and diagrams that used green and red as the primary colours. These charts were impossible to read and highly confusing to those who are colour blind. It is easy to see how an inability to actually see a clear diagram could be seen by the teacher as not being able to interpret the information.

 

People with colour vision defects are ineligible for certain professions, for example the fire services, train drivers, aircraft pilots and electrical engineers within the armed forces. The reasons are normally founded on safety concerns. A fireman would not be able to see glowing embers in the aftermath of a fire, and this may result in another fire. Train drivers need to read signals at a moments notice (pictured to the right is a standard signal). Failure to do so may be fatal. Aircraft pilots must be able to clearly read beacons, aircraft position lights, charts and approach slope indicators. In the case of engineers, confusing two wires could cause a serious malfunction to equipment with potential fatal consequences.

 

With this in mind, it is important that a child know that they are colour blind at a young age, and not to find out when applying for a job 20 years later.

 

 

 

On the author

 

My name is James Brawn, I am a pre-registation optometrist with an independent practice in Wales. I will be starting my PhD in Vision Science in October at my alma mater Cardiff University.

 

Feel free to follow me on twitter @brawnybalboa

eye health
06, Apr 2014

Why Is My Optician So Interested in My General Health?

 Jason Searle


Jason Searle

Why Is My Optician So Interested in My General Health?

I am currently in my pre-registration year as an optometrist and one of the key things we are assessed on is our history taking.  History taking is one of the most important parts of an eye examination and in 95% of sight tests, a careful history can tell us exactly what the cause of your problem is and allow us to pick the right tests to examine you appropriately.

Asking about general health is a key part of the history taking.  Many patients may think we are being nosey when asking how healthy they are when actually we are building a list of expected issues that may arise within the sight test and modifications to the tests and record keeping to make sure we provide you with the best possible care.

Two key health conditions we look into are hypertension and diabetes.  As Vishal Kotecha wrote in the blog “Why have an eye test at the optician”, diabetes and hypertension can be picked up by looking at the back of the eye. By knowing if you have these issues, it can help us be more alert to the changes these conditions cause and allow us to manage you appropriately.  Although diabetes can be detected through eye examinations, many of our diabetic patients have been diagnosed already.  We may ask how long you have been diagnosed, how you are keeping control on your condition and if you are under any other monitoring (such as diabetic screening or blood pressure monitoring schemes) as this can also give us vital information on the state of your eyes and how best to manage our findings.

However, hypertension and diabetes are not the only conditions that can indicate eye problems.  Arthritis can lead to susceptibility to inflammatory eye diseases such as scleritis and anterior uveitis (both conditions that cause painful and red eyes), and high cholesterol lead to blocked vessels in the eye, which can cause a sudden loss of vision. Therefore you can see the importance of telling your optician of any health complaints you may have so we can look out for specific signs in order to catch any potential problems early!

Medication is also an interesting question that we ask. Many people are (quite rightly) defensive over their medication as to many medication is personal.  However, knowing your medication can be vital as we can often pick up health complaints you may have forgotten about or not thought important to mention.  Beta-blockers (such as atenolol) isused in hypertension treatment, bisphosphonates (such as alendronic acid) used in osteoporosis and vigabatrin in epilepsy.  Sometimes your meds give us more information than you know!

But we aren’t just interested in medication for your current health complaints – some medication can have side effects on your eyes and your vision.  The birth control pill and antihistamines (used in hayfever and other allergies) can lead to dry eye.  Anti-malarial tablets such as chloroquine can lead to loss of parts of your vision and even colour-blindness.  Steroids (for medical purposes…and otherwise…) can lead to glaucoma (through raised eye pressure) and cataracts. These are just some of the drugs that can have side-effects and many more are out there.  Therefore telling your optician what you are taking can again help us detect any problems before they cause you problems!

As you can see, when we ask about your health, we aren’t being nosey but only asking as we are interested in keeping you healthy!  Remember, an eye test is a confidential consultation, so don’t be embarrassed and you can be assured all questions we ask are there for your best interest.

Many thanks to Jason Searle a quite brilliant blog

 

Happy Mother’s Day 2014

After months of dreary, grey skies, lashing winds, pelting rain and freezing cold, spring has finally come to London, and it couldn’t be at a better time. For spring is a time that represents new life, and today is Mother’s Day! For Mother’s Day, Good Looking Optics went around Enfield Town interviewing our local glasses-wearing mothers.

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Mother’s Day window display in Ma Battley’s Sweet Emporium & Tea Room in Enfield Town

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Mother’s Day window display in Ma Battley’s Sweet Emporium & Tea Room in Enfield Town

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Mother’s Day window display in Ma Battley’s Sweet Emporium & Tea Room in Enfield Town

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Mother’s Day window display in Ma Battley’s Sweet Emporium & Tea Room in Enfield Town

The first mother we spoke to was Ravinder, who was out and about Enfield Town with her eleven-year-old daughter Leah. She wears varifocals from Specsavers and is 40 years old.

Q: For you, what is the best part about being a mother?

Ravinder: It’s emotionally fulfilling.

Q: What did you used to do for your mother on Mother’s Day?

Ravinder: Well, usually a card, presents, flowers.

When we asked her what she planned to do for Mother’s Day, Ravinder replied, “Oh, we’re going to my mum’s to give her a present and card. Actually, we must get one today!”

“Make one!” piped up Leah.

Of course, Leah’s plans for her own mother on Mother’s Day were kept firmly under lock and key.

We also spoke to Kasia, who we found near Enfield Town Library out with her son, although she has two, one twelve and one nine. Her own glasses were bought in her native Poland for her shortsightedness, and she’s been wearing glasses since she was seven.

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Kasia

Q: What did you used to do for your mother on Mother’s Day?

Kasia: Depending on my age, it could be breakfast in bed, a card, or a gift.

Q: Do you have any plans for Mother’s Day?

Kasia: We’re going out with my mum to go for dinner, probably Chinese.

Maryanne we met in Enfield Town Park. She has transitional glasses, which she bought from Specsavers, and has been wearing glasses for twenty years.

Q: How many children do you have?

Maryanne: Two, a son and daughter, Joseph and Maya. He’s three years and she’s six months.

Q: Do you plan to have more children in the future?

Maryanne: Not right now, but never say never.

Q: For you, what is the best part about being a mother?

Maryanne: I guess just seeing them grow and develop into their own being.

When asked about her Mother’s Day plan, she laughed and responded, “Oh, I don’t know, ask him!” directing me to her husband, Dennis.

“I can’t reveal that secret now. Pamper her!” Dennis replied.

We next spoke to Louisa, who’s shortsighted and has needed glasses for the past twenty years. She has one boy who’s nearly three years old. When asked if she ever planned to have more children, she replied, “Might do. Don’t know, we’ll have to see what fate brings, and whether this lot drives me mad first!”

Q: For you, what is the best part about being a mother?

Louisa: It’s really difficult to know… Maybe learning to trust yourself – apart for when you don’t! And you know, eyesight gets better during pregnancy…  It’s something to do with hormones… Mine got miles better and my opticians were telling me my prescription was too strong.

We’d love to hear some of your stories about your mothers, motherhood and Mother’s Days past and present. Just share this article on Facebook and post a comment.

Lastly, we spoke to Christine, who normally wears contacts but will switch to glasses at weekends. She has one four-year-old son.

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Christine

Q: For you, what is the best part about being a mother?

Christine: Growing up with kids together, it feels like you’re achieving something, living with them, seeing them go through the different stages, seeing what they achieve. Like, seeing them walk, talk, brush their teeth, you feel happy.

Q: Do you have any plans for Mother’s Day?

Christine: [Mum and I] are booked to play bowling and have dinner together.

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Oakwood Florist Mother’s Day display

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Oakwood Florist Mother’s Day display

To all you mums out there…

 

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Super-Mum!

You’re super! Happy Mother’s Day!

You can visit the Good Looking Optics website at www.goodlookingoptics.co.uk

This article and these photos were taken by Dominique Duong. If you’d like to see more of my artwork, you can follow me at my DeviantArt account (http://dominiqueduong.deviantart.com/gallery), my Facebook page (www.facebook.com/dom.duong.7) and my Tumblr (http://yuenchien.tumblr.com)

Lewis-Lodge
27, Feb 2014

Work Experience At Goodlooking Optics.

Are you thinking of doing Your Work Experience at good looking optics ?

  • Are you ready for your interview?
  • Do you know what the dress code is?
  • Are you aware of the working hours?
  • Do you reckon you have the optic vibe?

If the answer is Yes you need to know some stuff before you call to book an interview date.

1. Learn something about Goodlooking Optics

2. Check out your Objectives

Objectives

We were Finalist  of the best work experience in the UK 2010 this is part of the reason why;

Attitude:

clinical:  This stuff is useful if you are going to work in an optician
Myopia, Presbyopia, Astigmatism and Hyperopia
Varifocals/ Single Vision/Bifocals
What frames suit you face?
What frames are in fashion?
Contact lenses types
Diabetes how does affect the eye?

This section is great for anybody interested in business studies.

Business:
Customer service how well to & not to sell
Answer the phone professionally
Work in a team
Understand U.S.P.K.P.I
Street Fighting
World-Class customer’s service
Market Research

You will use these skills your whole life . Sharpen you up

Personal:
Reading Body Language
Great PX in different languages
Understanding music / art
Mirroring interview skills
Set min 2 goal for yourself in next 10 years
Time management
Own a C.V
Getting your was negotiating skills
Character reference

Question: How much do you know at the start, how much will you know at the end

2011 baby facebook/ youtube  linkedin this is fun marketing

Multimedia: Create your own blog
Post a video on YouTube
Add 100 friends on Facebook, Create your own flicker. Start a page on www.last.fm
Start a twitter 

Dress Code

In good looking optics looking smart but fashionable is part of what makes us unique.

Ideas for girls:

  • Blouses / Shirts
  • Smart trousers (no denim)
  • smart shoes (not converses, vans, plimsolls e.c.t)
  • dresses / skirts providing tights are worn (no leggings)

Ideas for boys:

  • a shirt and tie
  • smart trousers (no denim)
  • smart shoes (no trainers)

Look Sharp!!!

The hours:

The hours for work experience students are 9am – 5pm, including a 1 hour unsupervised lunch break.

Objectives

 
 

Work experience for GoodLookingOptics. Best new business in Enfield

 
 
 
 
Attitude:
Fine wine                       
Fishing Juggling
Horses
 
Clinical:
Myopia, Presbyopi, Astigmatism and Hyperopia
Varifocals/ Single Vision/Bifocals
What frames suit you face?
What frames are in fashion?
Contact lenses types
Diabetes how does affect the eye?
 
Business:
Customer service how well to & not to sell
Answer the phone professionally
Work in a team
Understand U.S.P.K.P.I
Street Fighting
World-Class customer’s service
Market Research

Personal:
Reading Body Language
Great PX in different languages
Understanding music / art
Mirroring interview skills
Set min 2 goal for yourself in next 10 years
Time management
Own a C.V
Getting your was negotiating skills
Character reference

Question: How much do you know at the start, how much will you know at the end

Multimedia: Create your own blog
Post a video on YouTube
Add 100 friends on Facebook, Create your own flicker. Start a page on www.last.fm
Start a twitter

Does this make any sence?

 

Goodlooking Opticians helping young people to learn and get a good  job in the future. Transferable skills baby

i like this one lowquality though:(

check out the link Iebe business Awards Runner up of best work experience in the UK

 

https://registration.livegroup.co.uk/iebe2/Finalists/

At good looking optics you are asked to have a blog and update it every day . Here are some good examples;

work experience at good looking optics intervie

 

By Firas999

My interview was at 4.30 20th July. for work experience at good looking optics. When searching up before on the Internet for their address it said they had success as the best new business in Enfield a couple of years back. I was kind of intimidated but also kind of honoured. Before the start of my interview I was quite nervous but the staff at good looking optics were polite, well mannered and kind in making me feel less nervous. Even though I was quite late to the interview, becasuse I called them before I arrived explaining about the traffic they were patient and understanding and I was still ok to do the interview. In my interview I was asked what were my main attributes and what could I contribute to good looking optics. I was also asked if the staff were all busy and I was only available and a customer asked me a question about the optics which I did not understand, what would I do? After answering all of these questions in a nervous fashion, they accepted me as a work experience student and so I could work there from Monday the 6th of September till the 10th of September.

work experience at Good looking optics 1st day

When I got to good looking optics I met many of the staff and was shown what I would be doing that day. I was shown around the place and I than helped findind files of people from the filing cabinet. I was given objectives to do on a computer so I could get a better knowledge about good looking optics. I was set objectives like finding meaning of optical words, making a blog and posting a video on youtube. At lunch, the staff were so layed back and kind, I got an hour lunch break. After lunch I got a free eye test because I was under the age of 16 and the NHS had agreed for children under the age of 16 to have free eye tests. This eye test was actually important because it was my first eye test in a couple of years and it meant I was shortsighted and I needed glasses. Also because I was under the age of 16 these glasses were free. I was shown by one of the staff how to make the glass that fits in the frame for my new glasses. It was an interesting process, I was hopeless at it because it took a while to handle. I than completed some of the other objectives. PHEW WORK IS TIRING THOUGH BUT I THINK I MIGHT LIKE WORKING IN AN OPTICIANS WHEN IM OLDER.

  the things you will be doing ;

Day 4 , its testing day so carmel was back and it was busy! i had done alot i swear i went to tescos so so so so so many times it was crazy , well any ways , yesterday i done a bit of exigen helped re order some files and i even helped a lady to pick the right glasses , :D the ones she ended up picking she was well happy about it , but yeah , valentines day so it was quite relaxing even though it was so busy , because of the music it was too slow and to loved up for my liking but relaxing still though, so yeah work experience is getting better and better as the days go past, tomorrow is my last day so yeah i shall leave a post then about it .
14 February 2008, 15:47:05 | noreply@blogger.com (yusuf)Go to full article
Wednesday wasnt as busy as tuesday but i had alot to do still since carmel wasnt in and it was just me tom and garry, well first had to sort out upstairs and do some exigen soooooo long , and had to sort out which frames are gonna be returned and which ones we keeping , right after lunch i had a mission , i had to go to B n Q while listenin to……………………. 50 WAYS TO MOTIVATE YOURSELF!!! sounds interesting init , but believe it or not it actually is it can c hange you , IT HELPS YOU TO THINK ABOUT YOUR GOALS AND KEYS IN LIFE, HAVING DONE THIS BY THE END OF THE DAY I HAD A PRESENTATION TO DO ABOUT WHAT I HAD LISTENED TO , AND ALL WENT WELL , Tom as a “Joke” said tomorow meaning today i have to sing for a presentation but in the end it got turned over so now Garry and Tom have to sing and to be honest i dont think tom is prepared so this should be hilarious.

 

Ways of the Highly Successful:

1-        They define themselves to precisely what they want to do.

2-        They set demanding but not unattainable time scales, in which to do it.

3-        They are prepared to discuss and take advice on  how to do things.

4-        They are single minded in reaching their goal.

5-        They demand high performance from themselves and others.

6-        They work better when under pressure.

7-        They are never satisfied with what they do, and always want to do better.

8-        They are enthusiastic about the task and convey their enthusiasm to others.

9-        They can build a rapport with everybody, from the homeless person on the street, to the pope.

10-     Personality is important you need to have willpower and determination.

40  things to do without asking:

1)       Organize the catalog cupboard.

2)       Arrange lenses according to power.

3)       Organize the cases.

4)       Clean glasses

5)       Tidy up things that are out of place.

6)       Organize the red, green and blue trays.

7)       Price frames if needed.

8)       Check if records are in proper order.

9)       Do any of your objectives.

10)    See if anyone wants a drink.

11)    Fill any gaps in the glasses.

12)    Empty out the bins.

13)    Light the candles and add the oil burner.

14)    Clean the shelves.

15)    Organize storage cupboard.

16)    Wash dishes.

17)    Pull out record cards for next day patients.

18)    On Wednesdays clean the eye testing room.

19)    Dust out dust.

20)    Put records that out of the draws back in, in correct order.

21)    Make the mirrors sparkling clean.

22)    Add records to system that need it.

23)    Make sure there are no gaps on the glasses shelves.

24)    Tidy up the children area.

25)    Make sure the magazines/newspapers/books are not over spilling and are neat.

26)    Tidy up staff office desk.

27)    Listen to a 100 ways to motivate-audio tape.

28)    Make sure the upstairs floor has no stains on it e.g. paint or chewing gum.

29)    Take recycling to recycling bins.

30)    Add to this list if you can.
1. Offer tea, coffee or hot chocolate-ask them how they like it, what strength, etc.

2. Ask patients how they are and how their day is going.

3. Offer the patients sweets.

4. Offer to clean patient’s jewellery.

5. Explain the reading chart of patients.

6. Switch music to suit the customer.

7. Ask older patients how they got here and offer call them taxi when they are leaving.

8. Look after patient’s children while they are having they sight test.

9. Explain the pupilometer to patients.

10. Offer to buy patient’s lunch if they come for a sight test during their lunch hour.

11. Involve customers in our conversations.

12. Offer to fix, adjust and clean patient’s existing glasses.

13. Compliment patients on their hair, nails, style.

14. Talk about the week end

15. Ask patients about what they are going to be doing at the weekend.

 

At the end of the work experience @goodlooking optics you will be a new stronger individual. The world will be at your feet!

http://www.sec-ed.co.uk/cgi-bin/go.pl/article/article.html?uid=79950;type_uid=2;section=Features  Award winning too

What’s Othphamology

Ophthalmology is the branch of medicine that deals with the anatomy, physiology and diseases of the eye. An ophthalmologist is a specialist in medical and surgical eye problems. Since ophthalmologists perform operations on eyes, they are both surgical and medical specialists.

Ophthalmologists are medically trained doctors with specialist skills in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of diseases of the eye and visual system. They treat patients of all ages, from babies to the elderly. Most aim to become consultants, where the role combines the technical skills of a micro surgeon with the therapeutic and diagnostic skills of a doctor.

There are a small number of medical ophthalmologists or ophthalmic physicians, who are trained in general medicine as well as ophthalmology and take a holistic view, treating the whole patient and not just focusing on the eye. They may provide laser treatment but do not carry out surgery.

Typical work activities

Ophthalmologists work predominantly with hospital outpatients. Common conditions are cataracts, glaucoma, diabetes and degenerative conditions resulting from ageing. They work in hospital eye casualty departments, outpatient clinics, the operating theatre and laser eye surgery workstations.

THE REFRACTOR

Tasks typically involve:

  • assessing and examining patients in order to make a diagnosis;
  • management of ophthalmic conditions, taking into account both medical and psychological aspects of patient care;
  • managing busy general outpatient clinics, emergency eye clinics and specialist clinics;
  • ward rounds, but this is limited as most ophthalmic patients have day surgery and do not stay in hospital overnight;
  • working well as part of a multi-disciplinary team that includes optometrists, orthoptists and nurses;
  • collaboration with other specialists, including diabetologists, neurologists, ENT (ear, nose and throat) and maxillofacial surgeons, paediatricians, amongst others;
  • operating equipment such as ophthalmoscopes, slit lamps and lenses;
  • carrying out surgical procedures using an operating microscope, small incision (keyhole) surgery, laser surgery, etc.;
  • making high-level judgements due to the complexities of ophthalmic conditions;
  • communicating and empathising with patients and family members;
  • educating patients to understand their medical condition;
  • handling legal documentation for the certification of patients as blind or partially sighted;
  • supporting health promotion and disease prevention activities.

Medical ophthalmologists are also involved in:

  • management of medical disorders affecting vision, such as inflammatory, vascular, neurological and genetic disorders, thyroid eye disease, diabetes and strokes, by using an holistic approach and not just focusing on the eye;
  • using therapeutic procedures, such as laser therapy and intraocular, periocular and botox injections;
  • carrying out biopsies of tissues, including the eye;
  • managing diabetes retinal screening programmes.

For those in consultant posts, duties also include:

  • leadership and coordination of members of the ophthalmology team;
  • teaching/training junior doctors and other healthcare professionals;
  • research;
  • management of resources, practice development or leading on specific aspects of care.

imagesCAX6F67K

Salary and Conditions

 

  • Junior doctors in their first year of postgraduate foundation training earn a basic salary of around £22,400 a year. The basic salary in Foundation Year 2 increases to £27,800. They also receive a supplement or banding according to the rotation. This is based on the intensity of work and the number of hours worked in excess of 40 hours per week and/or work outside the hours of 7am – 7pm, Monday to Friday.
  • Doctors in specialist training earn a basic salary of around £29,700 plus supplement.
  • Consultants earn a basic annual salary of between around £74,500 and £100,400 depending on length of service and payment of additional performance related awards.

 

What’s an Optometrist

The term “optometry” comes from the Greek words ὄψις (opsis; “view”) and μέτρον (metron; “something used to measure”, “measure”, “rule”).

Optometry is a health care profession concerned with the health of the eyes and related structures, as well as vision, visual systems, and vision information processing in humans.

Optometrists examine patients’ eyes, test their sight, give advice on visual problems and prescribe and fit spectacles or contact lenses when needed. They are trained to recognise diseases of the eye, such as glaucoma and cataract, as well as general health conditions such as diabetes. They refer patients to medical practitioners when necessary, as well as sometimes sharing the care of patients with chronic conditions. Most of these activities involve the use of specialist equipment.

Most optometrists work in high street practices which may be independent or part of a regional or national chain. A smaller number work in hospitals alongside other healthcare professionals such as doctors and orthoptists. Some optometrists work in academic settings doing research and/or teaching, and also in the optical manufacturing industry.

imagesCA8AB7BM   imagesCAT5A5U3

Typical work activities

Tasks of an optometrist in community practice typically involve:

  • communicating with patients to get detailed case histories;
  • examining the eyes of patients of all ages to detect signs of injury, disease, abnormality or vision defects;
  • checking for signs and symptoms of general health conditions (e.g. diabetes);
  • using specialist equipment for diagnosis and testing;
  • issuing prescriptions for spectacles or contact lenses;
  • fitting and checking prescribed lenses in order to correct vision defects;
  • offering advice and reassurance about vision-related matters;
  • offering help and advice for patients choosing frames and lenses;
  • writing referral communications to doctors;
  • liaising with other medical practitioners and sometimes sharing the care of patients with chronic ophthalmic conditions;
  • meeting sales targets with regard to selling spectacles or contact lenses;
  • undertaking continuing education and training (CET).

In addition, some optometrists may be involved in:

  • managing staff, including dispensing opticians and clerical staff;
  • supervising and training junior staff;
  • managing the retail aspects of spectacles, contact lenses and other vision care products;
  • administering, organising and planning the development of the practice;
  • liaising with sales representatives from vision care product suppliers;
  • owning or managing a practice.

Salaries and Conditions

 

  • There is no set minimum salary for the pre-registration year in private practice but most practices offer salaries ranging from £14,000 to £17,000 per annum.
  • Range of typical starting salaries (private practice): £19,500-£28,000.
  • Range of typical salaries at senior level/with experience (private practice), typically after five years in the job post registration: £37,500-£53,600.
  • Locum daily rates range from £221 to £283.
          imagesCAOCSEA7                 

Whats an Dispensing Optician

A dispensing optician is trained to dispense and fit spectacles and other optical aids, working from the prescriptions written by optometrists and ophthalmologists.

Dispensing opticians advise patients on various types of lenses and spectacle frames, including advice on style, weight and colour. They also advise patients on how to wear and care for their spectacles and, with further training as contact lens opticians (CLOs), their contact lenses.

The majority of dispensing opticians work in high street outlets for large, multiple-chain optician stores or for independent practices. The role requires ext ensive use of technical expertise and good customer service skills. Selling is also an important part of the job.

Typical work activities:                                  

The role of a dispensing optician may include:

  • interpreting optical prescriptions written by optometrists or ophthalmologists;
  • giving advice to patients on lens type, frames and styling;
  • with further training, fitting contact lenses and giving advice on their care and use;
  • taking frame and facial measurements to ensure correct fit and positioning;
  • advising partially sighted patients on the use of low vision aids;
  • advising patients when adjustments or repairs to spectacles are needed;
  • selecting, managing and ordering a range of optical products;
  • ordering lenses from prescription houses;
  • checking lenses on delivery to ensure that they meet the required specifications;
  • arranging and maintaining shop displays;
  • liaising with sales representatives from vision care product suppliers;
  • supervising and training trainee dispensing opticians.

Dispensing opticians who choose to take on additional store management responsibilities may also undertake the following activities:antique

  • recruiting and overseeing the professional development of staff;
  • administering, organising and planning the development of the business;
  • keeping accurate patient and business records;
  • undertaking management and marketing activities.

 Salaries and conditions:

  • Range of typical salaries: £14,000-£30,000.
  • Typical salaries for specialists and managers: £25,000 and £35,000.
  • There is no set pay scale for dispensing opticians, and salaries vary enormously between employers.
  • Working hours are usually 9am to 6pm.
  • Dispensing opticians generally work between 35 and 40 hours a week, Mondays to Saturdays, with one day off in the week. Many practices are also open on Sundays and bank holidays, so weekend work is common.
Goodlooking optics

Goodlooking optics

Stay Motivated

RIP Zig Ziglar you made a big difference to my life ….

Nadeem Adam‏@Nadeem_Adam

Thanks for the follow back Gary! That half an hour or so on the stage was genius! @Opticians

Higher standards = Higher Achievements

“Stay Motivated

If you think you can you probably will
If you think you can’t you probably   will not
Henry Ford

What you think is what you are …
Lazy when  young Poor when old
Mahatma Gandhi

Abi Walsh‏@AbiMWalsh

@Opticians That really showed, cos man did you deliver! Seems you’ve affected loads of student optoms #MakingADifference #SleepWell ! :)

Goals For Napoleon Hill’s takeaway

Positive mental Attitude – Stay Away from negative people  & control your environment .
Good Health –too much Kfc?
No Stress   Just Moo
Hope –In the bag
Share –C.D
Labour of love- love it
Self Discipline  – work it for the long term.
Interpersonal Skills
Money- Rich Dad Poor Dad is a book /  audio by Robert Kiyosaki   learn how it money works.

Don’t get buried Alive in your comfort zone Anthony Robbins has dedicated his life to modeling the most successful people. You really should tube this guy he is amazing.
How do you master your time? Brian Tracy Products – Time Management.

Shaimil Shah‏@Shaimil_S

@Opticians #EyeOpener2012 great speech yesterday! makes me put things into perspective! great weekend all round!

Burning Desire  Gary Vaynerchuk’s is the person to talk about his passions, & hustle You tube, facebook, buy his book, pod casts follow him on twitter  just check him out! He is my favourite  !

Free sunglasses worth £79.00 with eye test (book it before you come & bring this paper with you) Garry Kousoulou Find me on facebook./ twiiter. Look out for me on C4 around may2011 N.B I hope I have helped you in a small way. Stay positive, and you will smash it for the rest of your life . I really do hope you take away the 9 key points to being successful. 