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Opticians and Designer Frames

 

Ever wondered why some brands are more successful than others? Even though the designs and items are pretty much the same? Why do they receive completely different types of attention? The secret? Visibility!

Once upon a time, in a not so far away land, lived a man named Guccio Gucci. Similarly to his designs, he was ‘Made in Italy’. He opened the first Gucci store in 1921. His four sons also joined the brand, and in 1952 when Guccio passed away, they opened a firm. From this point on, the name ‘Gucci’ was never the same again. It was, and still remains, one of the most iconic brands.

Brands, brands, brands! Our subconscious minds are targeted everyday when it comes to brands.
As there are so many, the competition through advertisement is immense. In our store, competition is not an issue as more than 30 brands are available to try on. When it comes to brands, visibility is a major aspect. A brilliant example of this would be Beyoncé at the Met Gala (picture here from Vogue).

Just in terms of social media, Beyoncé has a collective of 100 million followers. This enables more visibility and how brands are recognized.

But what gets brands to where they are? Well, there are some top characteristics;

  • Acknowledging your audience – taking into consideration what your target audience would be interested in.
  • Uniqueness – There are a number of brands that are very similar, but you will notice a few different aspects of a design that you may think is the same as another. It’s the little things!
  • Passion – Ever heard the saying “People with great passion can make the impossible happen” ?
  • Consistency – With anything, consistency is key. Without consistency there is no reliability which will generate an audience that will deteriorate in size.
  • Competitiveness – There will always be competition, with anything that we do. I mean, how can competition not be an issue on a planet with 7.4 billion people? When it comes to battling competitors, going above and beyond any expectations are imperative in order to get the publicity and attention needed from consumers.
  • Exposure – Trying to get a message across that a consumer has never seen nor heard anything about is difficult. Expose and advertise!

Other brands, such as Ray Ban, began as just a simplistic idea first established in the 1930’s when aircrafts began to fill our blue skies. Pilots complained of headaches and nausea owing to the close proximity they had to endure owing to the sun, and the strong white and blue hues of the sky. Ray Ban solved this issue as a green pair of glasses known as ‘Anti – Glare’. These could cut out glare without obscuring vision.

Brands are a strange concept. In terms of eyewear, are they not all just supplying an easier conclusion to our everyday lives? If only there was a place that stocked with some of the biggest designer frames in Optics…..

Oh wait, there is.

 

Why not drop by and come take a look at some of our collection in-store!

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Yes you have read this New Years offer correctly. 2 weeks worth of daily contact lenses for 99p

2 weeks worth of any daily contact lenses
Simple offer for the new year

Just email us your
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Digital Eye Strain

Having trouble seeing objects close up? You might be long sighted

Is your child short sighted?

What is Glaucoma?

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Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of sight loss, affecting more than 500,000 in England and Wales, not including those who haven’t been diagnosed. If left untreated, it can cause complete loss of vision.Glaucoma

Glaucoma is a disease that affects your vision, and is caused from a build up of pressure within the eye. The eyeball contains aqueous humour, a fluid which is continuously produced by the eye, and any excess is drained through tubes. When the fluid doesn’t drain properly, the pressure will start to build up. This is known as intraocular pressure, which causes damage to the optic nerve(connects the eye to the brain) and nerve fibres from the retina(light sensitive nerve tissue at the back of the eyeball).

The most common type of Glaucoma, Chronic open-angle Glaucoma, affects every two in 100 people over the age of 40, and every five in 100 people over the age of 80. For those who have family members with Glaucoma, suffer from diabetes, over the age of 40 or are from African/Caribbean descent, you are at high risk, and should ensure you have regular eye tests.

 

Types of Glaucoma & Symptoms

There are four different types of Glaucoma

 

– Chronic open-angle Glaucoma

there aren’t any noticeable symptoms. The condition develops very slowly, and those affected by it won’t realize what’s happening because it starts with their peripheral vision (side vision). It then works itself towards the centre, and it’s only when it’s advanced, will you know you have glaucoma.

 

– Acute angle-closure Glaucoma

develops quickly, with severe symptoms such as intense pain, redness of the eye, headaches, tender eye area, seeing halos around lights; misty vision & loss of vision in one or both your eyes. You may feel sick from some of these symptoms. They aren’t constant, and you’ll only have them for an hour or two before disappearing.

 

– Secondary Glaucoma

Caused from other conditions, eye injuries or treatments such as operations and medication, which causes a rise in the eye pressure. The symptoms can be confused with the conditions that cause a rise of pressure e.g. Uveitis (inflammation of the middle layer of the eye) caused headaches and painful eyes, but you’ll have the standard symptoms such as misty vision and rings/halos around lights.

 

– Developmental Glaucoma

Very rare, and difficult to diagnose the symptoms, due to the age of your child. Your child may show symptoms such as

  • Sensitivity to light
  • Watery Eyes
  • Jerky movements of the eyes
  • Large and cloudy cornea.
  • having a squint

If you notice any of these, call Enfield’s award winning opticians, Goodlooking Optics on 020 8364 4444, and book yourself an eye exam.

If you enjoyed this blog, you might like some of our others!

Digital Eye Strain

Having trouble seeing objects close up? You might be long sighted

Is your child short sighted?

What is Glaucoma?

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opticians in Enfield

Nervous.

 

That was the only word that I could use to describe how I felt on my way to my appointment at Goodlooking Optics.

 

Thinking of all these different types of equipment near your eyes sent my stomach turning. I really didn’t want glasses, but basic tasks such as reading and writing were becoming almost impossible.

Surprisingly as soon as I stepped foot into the opticians my nerves seemed to disappear as I was greeted by smiling faces, a buzzing room, that was decorated with artwork and photos, which worked really well with the all white theme, and the music wasn’t that bad.

Eye Test Enfield

There wasn’t an awkward moment of having to try and get someone’s attention, as your presences didn’t go unnoticed, all I had to do was give my name, date of birth, appointment time, then I was escorted upstairs by one of the staff. Sadly, this resulted in the tension i had felt earlier slowly starting to return. Then I was asked to take a seat at a small cosy sitting area where I was offered tea or coffee from one of the work experiences they had working there, of course I accepted a lovely hot cup of tea ,which helped slightly with calming my returning anxiety, but what really surprised me was when a little girl who looked about 5 or 6 came up the stairs with her dad, she was offered some juice which she happily accepted, sadly, they didn’t realize they were out of juice until after the little girl had accepted, but they said “No problem sweetie, we will go and get you whatever juice you like, what do you want?” in a cooing soothing voice, this made me think this is a company that really cares, I knew I was in good hands. While waiting for my name to be called by the optometrist, I struck a conversation with one of the work experience, and learned that Goodlooking Optics won best work experience in Enfield a few years back.

Do you ever get those moments when you think that your nerves might be completely gone but then they creep back up on you when you least expect it? Well that is exactly what happened to me when the optometrist called my name.

 

My apprehension were clear as day, as I was sitting in a room, on chair with the optometrist, shaking like a leaf. The optom who’s name later learned was Sujal. Quickly picked up on this, giving me a comforting smile and assuring me that “The tests were simple, and there was nothing to be afraid of”, and she was right, all I had to do was read a few letters the best I could, and answering yes or no to if the lenses were better than the last that had been in front of me a few seconds before.

work experience Enfield

 

The eyes test was quickly over, and the optometrist said “Now, if you follow me down stairs we can pick some lenses for you” which only took 60 seconds ,which the great helps and tips I was given, I was able to find the perfect glasses for me, yes, they were Gucci glasses, i even got myself a nice pair of sunglasses.

Overall, the whole appointment only took me half an hour, it was simple, easy and the staff were friendly and more than happy to help, they definitely helped me to overcome my fear of opticians and find the perfect glasses. Probably, the best opticians in Enfield, I’ve been back 3 times since my first appointment, even all my friends and family who need glasses come to Goodlookng Optics, especially when they need an emergency eye tests in Enfield.

Truly amazing to be asked to do a talk to other opticians in the country Dubai.

This is how I Researched the market

Emailed 50 opticians asking for a appointment

Got my eyes tested all over Dubai.

Conclusion is getting your eyes tested in the UK is much more thorough we Checkley the internal part as well as your vision.

Need your eyes tested by a International speaker ?

Book a sight test in Enfield with goodlooking optics

  • Qualified Opticians
  • Est: 2004 Looking after the people of Enfield Eyes
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  • Making Glasses in 1 Hour
  • Qualified Opticians
  • Est: 2004 Looking after the people of Enfield Eyes
  • Open Sundays
  • Amazing Sight Tests in Enfield Town
  • Book on Line !!!
  • Making Glasses in 1 Hour

Garry Kousoulou speaks in the Middle East

Garry Kousoulou speaks in the Middle East

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Why does my Optometrist check my colour vision?

 

Colour and culture

 

Colours are deeply ingrained in human society and culture. Throughout history colours have been used to indicate prosperity (purple), purity (white), danger (red), health (green) among many others. National identity is always closely associated with colours (Orange for Netherlands, Red for Wales, Green for Ireland). Among its other uses colour can be used as a non-verbal command (traffic lights the obvious example) or to indicate gender (pink and blue).

 

 

Pick up any fashion magazine in a supermarket and there are pages devoted to the colours which are ‘in’ this season, and colours not to wear together. Crossing the road at the traffic lights there is a green man and a red man. In HMV there are piles of colourful album covers to catch your eye. That is before you even see the name of the artist (Green Day, Black Sabbath, Pink Floyd, Blue) or songs (Blue Suede Shoes, Yellow Submarine [left], Purple Rain).

 

Colour is ingrained so deep into our psyche that is incredibly difficult to complete dissociate it from anything in your daily life.

mavi jim

 

Why do we have colour vision?

 

As with many other creatures in the animal kingdom, through millions of years of evolution humans have developed the ability to discriminate colour. But why is this? Why should this trait have b                         een passed on throughout history? Following the Darwinian theory of evolution it is only logical to assume that the ability to discriminate colour proved advantageous, hence the ‘fitter’ individuals prospered and passed on their traits.

 

The best way to indicate how colour vision would be an advantage would be to put a few questions to the reader:

 

1)    Could you tell if a fruit is ripe or past its best?

2)    Could you differentiate between cooked and uncooked meat?

3)    Would you know if the frog you are holding is a poison dart frog or local amphibian?

 

Hopefully the answer to all 3 is yes! However I challenge you to try again without using colour as a guide. It is a lot harder. Therefore it is clear to see colour vision is an advantage

 

Based on this mechanism, through evolution we have seen animals develop some fantastic coloured displays for attracting a mate (as seen to the right), warding off predators and camouflaging into the background to hunt prey.

 

How does colour vision work?

 

Animals possess two types of light sensitive cells – rods & cones. Rods are mainly responsible for sensing brightness. They are most sensitive to movement and seeing incredibly dark images, but give poor detail. Cones are responsible for sensing colour and fine detail. Humans possess 1 type of rod and 3 types of cone, other mammals possess more or less.

 

Cones are sensitive to one particular colour, hence are highly stimulated by a light of that exact colour. Hence an animal with a cone sensitive to blue light would only be sensitive to blue objects. However this does not mean this animal would not see a red object. It just means that objects are either a shade of blue, or not blue at all. For sake of argument imagine an artist only using blue paint. He may water down the blue paint to change its shade, but cannot make the paint red.

 

In the case of humans, we have cones sensitive to blue, green and red. Therefore we can not just determine if an object is red or not, blue or not and green or not, but determine if it is a combination. This means that instead of being restricted to blue paint only, the artist could not mix a whole palette of colours, hence giving us colour vision!

 

As humans have 3 cones, we can perceive a larger range of colours than an animal with only 2 cones (for example a dog) and a smaller range than the mantis shrimp (pictured right) that has an incredible 12 cones! That being said even 2 animals with the same number of cones do not possess the same colours vision. Using the analogy of paint from above, you may use 2 different pots of paint that another artist, hence still use plenty of colour, just different ones.

 

As a matter of pure interest a recent study showed that 2% of women possess a 4th cone. Although in most cases this cone does not work, a few women in the study demonstrated superior colour differentiation than observed in a normal human. This study may explain the age old argument why women use a ridiculous number of words for purple (lavendar, thistle, plum, fuchsia, magenta, violet, in digo, amethyst etc).

 

So what is colour blindness?

 

As a child, a friend of mine tried convincing me that being colour blind was like watching black and white TV all day. You just saw 50 shades of gray and that was it. Although his logic and reasoning seemed sound, with a firmer understanding of the visual system as explained above, I would hope that you would know this is not the case!

 

In colour ‘blindness’ a perfectly normal person is either missing a photoreceptive cone (dichromat), or has a cone which does not work properly (anomalous trichromat). Due to in essence possessing only 2 cones, a person will not be able to perceive colours as well as someone with 3 cones. Brushing with 2 paints not 3 as it were.

 

This is caused due to a damaged gene carried on the X chromosome. As women carry two X chromosomes, a duplicate gene is present. In men however, as there is only one X chromosome, if the gene is damaged, there is no replacement. This is reflected in the prevalence of colour blindness – less than 0.1% of girls are colour blind, yet approximately 8% of men are colour blind. This means that an incredible 578 million men world wide are colour blind (assuming a world population of 7.2 billion). It should also be noted that as the X chromosome is passed on down the generations, it is common to find colour blindness runs in families.

 

Why does my Optometrist test my colour vision?

 

As illustrated in the previous paragraph, a whopping 8% of the male population is colour blind. Due to the pure numbers at work it is highly likely that in every school classroom that there is a boy who is colour blind. In general optometrists will test a childs colour vision at their first eye examination to check for colour blindness.

 

If a child is colour blind, it is very important for the parents to know this. As a child is in school they can be embarrassed and ridiculed for colouring in a picture the wrong colour. Handouts to the class and wall displays may also be incredibly difficult for a colour blind child to read (despite being perfectly legible to the ‘normal’ teacher). For the fashion conscious, colour blindness can cause a wardrobe catastrophe. A nightmare for many teenagers. For the very youngest children, even learning colours can be confusing and difficult as can be seen in the two images below:

The image to the left is the original, the image to the right is that seen by a red/green colour deficiency

 

In my own personal experience, I found a geography text book filled with pie charts and diagrams that used green and red as the primary colours. These charts were impossible to read and highly confusing to those who are colour blind. It is easy to see how an inability to actually see a clear diagram could be seen by the teacher as not being able to interpret the information.

 

People with colour vision defects are ineligible for certain professions, for example the fire services, train drivers, aircraft pilots and electrical engineers within the armed forces. The reasons are normally founded on safety concerns. A fireman would not be able to see glowing embers in the aftermath of a fire, and this may result in another fire. Train drivers need to read signals at a moments notice (pictured to the right is a standard signal). Failure to do so may be fatal. Aircraft pilots must be able to clearly read beacons, aircraft position lights, charts and approach slope indicators. In the case of engineers, confusing two wires could cause a serious malfunction to equipment with potential fatal consequences.

 

With this in mind, it is important that a child know that they are colour blind at a young age, and not to find out when applying for a job 20 years later.

 

 

 

On the author

 

My name is James Brawn, I am a pre-registation optometrist with an independent practice in Wales. I will be starting my PhD in Vision Science in October at my alma mater Cardiff University.

 

Feel free to follow me on twitter @brawnybalboa

 Jason Searle

Jason Searle

Why Is My Optician So Interested in My General Health?

I am currently in my pre-registration year as an optometrist and one of the key things we are assessed on is our history taking.  History taking is one of the most important parts of an eye examination and in 95% of sight tests, a careful history can tell us exactly what the cause of your problem is and allow us to pick the right tests to examine you appropriately.

Asking about general health is a key part of the history taking.  Many patients may think we are being nosey when asking how healthy they are when actually we are building a list of expected issues that may arise within the sight test and modifications to the tests and record keeping to make sure we provide you with the best possible care.

Two key health conditions we look into are hypertension and diabetes.  As Vishal Kotecha wrote in the blog “Why have an eye test at the optician”, diabetes and hypertension can be picked up by looking at the back of the eye. By knowing if you have these issues, it can help us be more alert to the changes these conditions cause and allow us to manage you appropriately.  Although diabetes can be detected through eye examinations, many of our diabetic patients have been diagnosed already.  We may ask how long you have been diagnosed, how you are keeping control on your condition and if you are under any other monitoring (such as diabetic screening or blood pressure monitoring schemes) as this can also give us vital information on the state of your eyes and how best to manage our findings.

However, hypertension and diabetes are not the only conditions that can indicate eye problems.  Arthritis can lead to susceptibility to inflammatory eye diseases such as scleritis and anterior uveitis (both conditions that cause painful and red eyes), and high cholesterol lead to blocked vessels in the eye, which can cause a sudden loss of vision. Therefore you can see the importance of telling your optician of any health complaints you may have so we can look out for specific signs in order to catch any potential problems early!

Medication is also an interesting question that we ask. Many people are (quite rightly) defensive over their medication as to many medication is personal.  However, knowing your medication can be vital as we can often pick up health complaints you may have forgotten about or not thought important to mention.  Beta-blockers (such as atenolol) isused in hypertension treatment, bisphosphonates (such as alendronic acid) used in osteoporosis and vigabatrin in epilepsy.  Sometimes your meds give us more information than you know!

But we aren’t just interested in medication for your current health complaints – some medication can have side effects on your eyes and your vision.  The birth control pill and antihistamines (used in hayfever and other allergies) can lead to dry eye.  Anti-malarial tablets such as chloroquine can lead to loss of parts of your vision and even colour-blindness.  Steroids (for medical purposes…and otherwise…) can lead to glaucoma (through raised eye pressure) and cataracts. These are just some of the drugs that can have side-effects and many more are out there.  Therefore telling your optician what you are taking can again help us detect any problems before they cause you problems!

As you can see, when we ask about your health, we aren’t being nosey but only asking as we are interested in keeping you healthy!  Remember, an eye test is a confidential consultation, so don’t be embarrassed and you can be assured all questions we ask are there for your best interest.

Many thanks to Jason Searle a quite brilliant blog

 

After months of dreary, grey skies, lashing winds, pelting rain and freezing cold, spring has finally come to London, and it couldn’t be at a better time. For spring is a time that represents new life, and today is Mother’s Day! For Mother’s Day, Good Looking Optics went around Enfield Town interviewing our local glasses-wearing mothers.

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Mother’s Day window display in Ma Battley’s Sweet Emporium & Tea Room in Enfield Town
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Mother’s Day window display in Ma Battley’s Sweet Emporium & Tea Room in Enfield Town
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Mother’s Day window display in Ma Battley’s Sweet Emporium & Tea Room in Enfield Town
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Mother’s Day window display in Ma Battley’s Sweet Emporium & Tea Room in Enfield Town

The first mother we spoke to was Ravinder, who was out and about Enfield Town with her eleven-year-old daughter Leah. She wears varifocals from Specsavers and is 40 years old.

Q: For you, what is the best part about being a mother?

Ravinder: It’s emotionally fulfilling.

Q: What did you used to do for your mother on Mother’s Day?

Ravinder: Well, usually a card, presents, flowers.

When we asked her what she planned to do for Mother’s Day, Ravinder replied, “Oh, we’re going to my mum’s to give her a present and card. Actually, we must get one today!”

“Make one!” piped up Leah.

Of course, Leah’s plans for her own mother on Mother’s Day were kept firmly under lock and key.

We also spoke to Kasia, who we found near Enfield Town Library out with her son, although she has two, one twelve and one nine. Her own glasses were bought in her native Poland for her shortsightedness, and she’s been wearing glasses since she was seven.

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Kasia

Q: What did you used to do for your mother on Mother’s Day?

Kasia: Depending on my age, it could be breakfast in bed, a card, or a gift.

Q: Do you have any plans for Mother’s Day?

Kasia: We’re going out with my mum to go for dinner, probably Chinese.

Maryanne we met in Enfield Town Park. She has transitional glasses, which she bought from Specsavers, and has been wearing glasses for twenty years.

Q: How many children do you have?

Maryanne: Two, a son and daughter, Joseph and Maya. He’s three years and she’s six months.

Q: Do you plan to have more children in the future?

Maryanne: Not right now, but never say never.

Q: For you, what is the best part about being a mother?

Maryanne: I guess just seeing them grow and develop into their own being.

When asked about her Mother’s Day plan, she laughed and responded, “Oh, I don’t know, ask him!” directing me to her husband, Dennis.

“I can’t reveal that secret now. Pamper her!” Dennis replied.

We next spoke to Louisa, who’s shortsighted and has needed glasses for the past twenty years. She has one boy who’s nearly three years old. When asked if she ever planned to have more children, she replied, “Might do. Don’t know, we’ll have to see what fate brings, and whether this lot drives me mad first!”

Q: For you, what is the best part about being a mother?

Louisa: It’s really difficult to know… Maybe learning to trust yourself – apart for when you don’t! And you know, eyesight gets better during pregnancy…  It’s something to do with hormones… Mine got miles better and my opticians were telling me my prescription was too strong.

We’d love to hear some of your stories about your mothers, motherhood and Mother’s Days past and present. Just share this article on Facebook and post a comment.

Lastly, we spoke to Christine, who normally wears contacts but will switch to glasses at weekends. She has one four-year-old son.

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Christine

Q: For you, what is the best part about being a mother?

Christine: Growing up with kids together, it feels like you’re achieving something, living with them, seeing them go through the different stages, seeing what they achieve. Like, seeing them walk, talk, brush their teeth, you feel happy.

Q: Do you have any plans for Mother’s Day?

Christine: [Mum and I] are booked to play bowling and have dinner together.

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Oakwood Florist Mother’s Day display
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Oakwood Florist Mother’s Day display

To all you mums out there…

 

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Super-Mum!

You’re super! Happy Mother’s Day!

You can visit the Good Looking Optics website at www.goodlookingoptics.co.uk

This article and these photos were taken by Dominique Duong. If you’d like to see more of my artwork, you can follow me at my DeviantArt account (http://dominiqueduong.deviantart.com/gallery), my Facebook page (www.facebook.com/dom.duong.7) and my Tumblr (http://yuenchien.tumblr.com)

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